How to Carry Injured People

Injured

How to Carry Injured People

 

Carrying Injured Illustration

 

Injured

© 2012 by Gary Benton, All Rights Reserved

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Step by step instructions on how to carry someone in an emergency. Do NOT move someone with a back or neck injury, unless it is a matter of immediate death. The movement can either cause additional injuries, or perhaps kill them.

 

1. Shows a common fireman's type of carry. While this looks simple and it is, you must be in good physical condition to carry someone very far. I found you'll grow tired very quickly and the heavier your victim is the less distance you can cover without rest. Remember, do NOT move someone with a broken back or neck unless absolute required to save their lives. Moving them may cause permanent injury or even kill them. Good carry if the victim is unconscious.

 

2. Shows how to tie a persons hands together and use your neck to move them. Be sure to keep your arms and legs on the outside of the victim and while this looks easy, it's hard on the neck. The heavier the person is the more difficult it becomes. Again, do NOT move anyone with a broken back or neck unless required. Good carry if the victim is unconscious.

 

3. Is a cradle type of carry, where the victim can sit on the arms of two persons. Good and fairly easy carry for heavier folks, but there is no support for the victims back, so you'll have to use this carry with someone who is alert and able to hold your shoulders. Again, do NOT move anyone with a broken back or neck unless required.

 

4. Shows another method of using arms to carry a person. Offers back support, but with heavier people it's somewhat hard to keep the hands together in the front of the victim. It may be easier if you use an "Indian's handshake" hold on the two hands in front. Do NOT move anyone with a broken back or neck unless required.

 

 

Carry Injured People

 

Gary Benton has over 45 years of outdoor experience in camping, hiking, fishing, and other activities. He's no armchair survival man, he's walked the walk from the arctic to the desert and all the area in between. Gary has an associates degree in Search and Rescue, Survival Operations, a B.S. in Industrial Occupational safety, and all but his thesis completed for a M.S. in Counseling Psychology.
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